Exposé Online banner

Papernut Cambridge — Nutlets 1967-80
(Gare du Nord GDNLP008, 2015, CD)

by Henry Schneider, Published 2015-08-31

Nutlets 1967-80 Cover art

The 2015 follow-up to last year’s There's No Underground is Nutlets 1967 – 80. Unlike the previous release of original tunes, this time around they chose to cover ten different Top 20 Brit pop tunes from 1967 – 1980, kind of an odd choice. All but the last song, “Rockers Delight,” appeared on the charts in the six-year period between 1967 and 1973. At that time I was in college and developing my interest in progressive, electronic, and experimental music. During those pre-punk years we suffered through pop, bubble gum, and disco music on the radio. Consequently I am unfamiliar with many of the cover songs on this new release. Nutlets is almost like a Doctor Demento compilation, but this time all the songs are performed by the same band as seen through Papernut Cambridge’s psych-pop lens. The album opens with Marc Bolan’s “Broken Hearted Blues” from 1973. I had already lost interest in T. Rex by 1972, so I never heard this song before. The second song is Hot Chocolate’s 1971 hit “I Believe in Love,” another song I do not know, but Papernut Cambridge integrates tremolo guitar and strings to this disco tune. Then we have a psych-pop cover of Cockney Rebel’s glam-rock 1973 hit “What Ruthy Said.” The Bystanders/The Casuals’ 1968 hit “Jesamine” follows this song. Next is a take on Lynsey de Paul’s 1972 bubble gum hit “Sugar Me,” followed by Paul Jones’ 1967 teeny bopper hit single “I’ve Been a Bad Boy.” The seventh song is a cover of Alvin Stardust’s 1973 hit “Jealous Mind.” Since these first seven songs were unknown to me, I really cannot comment on these cover versions. Next is the Edison Lighthouse’s 1970 hit “Love Grows (Where My Rosemary Goes),” a song that was so overplayed that I could not stand listening to it in 1970. And now I question why on earth would a band cover that song today? At least Papernut’s version does not induce a gag reflex. But I still hate this song. However, the final two songs make the whole disc worthwhile. Track nine is a cover of Jacky’s 1968 “White Horses,” the Brit TV show theme song. Papernut Cambridge give this song a dark and foreboding atmosphere, making me think that David Lynch would glom onto this version. A superior cover of this song was recorded by Saturn’s Ambush and released on Fruit de Mer’s Do Not Adjust Your TV Set 2011 release. The final track is a pseudo-reggae psych-pop cover of Mikey Dread’s 1980 hit “Rockers Delight.” “Rockers Delight” is the best track on the disc, and the band stretches their muscles on this song, more than just featuring Ian Button’s vocals.


Filed under: New releases, 2015 releases

Related artist(s): Papernut Cambridge

Latest news

2019-03-20
Freedom to Spend Unearths June Chikuma's Archives – Jun (June) Chikuma is well known for her video game and anime soundtracks, but she also released an album of experimental electronic music back in 1986 called Divertimento where she indulged the kind of spontaneity that wouldn't work in a soundtrack. RVNG Int'l label Freedom to Spend is bringing this overlooked item to broader attention with a deluxe reissue. » Read more

2019-03-03
Seaprog 2019 Lineup Almost Complete – The Seaprog festival in Seattle is scheduled for June 7-9 this year, and they've announced their lineup of performers. The revitalized Trettioåriga Kriget will cap Friday night, perennial favorites Marbin are on Saturday, and District 97 will finish off the fest on Sunday night. In support, they've booked a stellar variety of artists from the Northwest and around the world, including EchoTest, Markus Reuter and Trey Gunn, and the live debut of the amazing Troot project. » Read more

2019-02-21
You Can Be Part of an Ambient Electronic Project – The Gesture of History is a new electronic project put together by Sam Rosenthal of Black Tape for a Blue Girl, Steve Roach, and violist Sam Shadow. The music started as an instrumental track Rosenthal was working on for a Black Tape album, but took on a life of its own and demanded further enhancements. The majority of the funds raised will go to manufacturing costs for LP and CD editions, as well as other items as detailed on the Kickstarter page. » Read more

2019-01-31
Keyboardist Ingo Bischof R.I.P. – Keyboard player Ingo Bischof, best known as the longtime keyboard player of German band Kraan, passed away on January 29th, 2019. Bischof was born January 2, 1951 in Berlin-Kreuzberg and joined Kraan in 1975. » Read more

2019-01-11
Jazz Composer Mark Lomax, II Releases Epic 12CD Set – In addition to being a fine jazz drummer, Dr. Mark Lomax, II is a composer in residence at Ohio State University, where he has been very busy on the compositional front. The year 2019 is the 400th anniversary of the arrival of the first ship bringing African slaves to North America, and in commemoration of this, Lomax has produced 400: An Afrikan Epic, a 12 volume set of CDs featuring a variety of different musical ensembles. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Yes - Talk – Here's yet another album with the Yes name on it that bears almost no resemblance to the band's classic period, essentially a Trevor Rabin solo album with Jon Anderson singing. First, I've...  (1994) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues