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Osada Vida — The Body Parts Party
(Metal Mind MMP CD 0598, 2008, CD)

by Paul Hightower, Published 2009-07-01

The Body Parts Party Cover artBasing a concept album on the human body may be lazy, though happily the material and execution merit praise in this case. At first blush Osada Vida resemble other Polish progressive rock bands that favor symphonic prog traditions wedded to modern rock and alt-metal, a la Riverside. However, this quartet also bears a strong resemblance to Quebec’s Hamadryad, especially on potent and harmonically creative prog rock tracks like “Liver.” Glass Hammer fans will warm to the articulated arranging seen in “Tongue,” though thankfully this is a band well versed in symphonic prog traditions yet able to root their sound fully in the present — without aping Porcupine Tree. The use of modern production and engineering techniques is put to good use on the opener “Body” and Lukasz Lisiak’s vocal even sounds like The Smithereen’s Pat DiNizio (though I doubt it was intentional.) There’s much to like about this album, with the closer “Bone” perhaps best defining what Osada Vida is all about. At 11 minutes it’s the longest song and offers modern prog rock with some unexpected twists. For instance, guitarist Bartek Bareska drops the crunchy metal grind for slinkier Strat noodling, and keyboard player Rafal Paluszek covers a wide array of sounds ranging from soaring analog synths to classical piano. When the song delves into a jazzier vein you sense the group is venturing out of its comfort zone, though I appreciate the willingness to stretch out. They dare to challenge themselves and the results reward the effort. Highly recommended.

Filed under: New releases, Issue 37, 2008 releases

Related artist(s): Osada Vida

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