Exposé Online banner

Nash the Slash — Nosferatu
(Cut-Throat CUT5CD, 2001, CD)

by Jon Davis, Published 2001-12-01

Nosferatu Cover art

I’ve always had a weak spot for Nash the Slash. His goofy horror-show imagery and violin showmanship just bring a smile to my face. A soundtrack to the silent film classic Nosferatu, one of the first horror films ever made, seems like a perfect project for this Canadian original. In many ways, Mr. Slash is abnormally subdued this time out, with thirty short tracks (ranging from less than a minute to 5:27), some of which are adapted from Fauré’s “Requiem” and the “Danse Macabre” of Saint-Saens. It’s a one-man show, with overdubbed violins, mandolins, keyboards, and rhythm parts, and stylistically sticks fairly close to classical idioms, as seems appropriate for the music’s intended purpose. The somewhat claustrophobic sound of synthesized strings and sampled choir is perfectly suited to silent film accompaniment. The melodies are mostly pretty, soothing but with backing moods of melancholy and menace, and themes recur from time to time, tying it all together. Drum machine usage is infrequent, and not generally too obtrusive. His trademark fuzz-tone electric mandolin makes some appearances as well. Occasional sound effects (water noises, horses, and so on) heighten the effect, timed presumably with appropriate scenes in the movie. All in all, this is better than any other newly done silent film soundtrack I can think of. I hope someday to get hold of a copy of the film and play this album along with it. I’m sure it will fit better than Pink Floyd with The Wizard of Oz.


Filed under: New releases, Issue 23, 2001 releases

Related artist(s): Nash the Slash (Jeff Plewman)

Latest news

2017-10-13
Moonjune to Distribute Tony Levin's Back Catalog – It has been announced that Moonjune will now handle distribution for Tony Levin's catalog of releases. These great albums will now be a bit easier to get hold of, so check out the site and see what you're missing. The veteran of King Crimson and Stick Men worked with a host of great players on these albums, and we've reviewed most of them over the course of the years. » Read more

2017-09-26
Bandcamp Shines Light on Niches We Like – Bandcamp has developed into one of the best places to discover new music, and even a lot of old music is showing up there. In addition, their staff has been producing periodic articles spotlighting some interesting stylistic areas. On 20 September, they published one called "The New Face of Prog Rock" which bears checking out. » Read more

2017-09-06
Holger Czukay RIP – Holger Czukay, a musical experimentalist without boundaries who has been involved with expanding the sound palette of rock music since the late 60s, has died at the age of 79. After studying with Karlheinz Stockhausen in the early 60s, he became fascinated with the possibilities of rock music, and was a co-founder of the pioneering group Can. He leaves behind an impressive body of work both as musician and producer. » Read more

2017-08-22
John Abercrombie RIP – Another of the greats of jazz guitar has left us. John Abercrombie plied his way through a beautiful series of albums on the ECM label as well as bringing his talent to bear on albums by many of jazz's greatest artists. From his early work in the group Dreams to Gateway and outstanding work with Billy Cobham, Jack DeJohnette, Kenny Wheeler, and many more to his own trios and quartets, he brought a unique instrumental voice to the world. » Read more

2017-07-27
Yestival Dates Beef up the Beat – Word reaches us that Dylan Howe (son of guitarist Steve Howe) will be joining Yes on their "Yestival" tour, drumming alongside longtime band member Alan White. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

The Moody Blues - The Magnificent Moodies – In December '64 The Moody Blues first hit the U.K. charts with a cover of U.S. soul singer Bessie Banks' "Go Now," with its expansive harmonies sounding a bit like a British take on the Righteous...  (2007) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues