Exposé Online banner

Mostly Other People Do the Killing — Loafer's Hollow
(Hot Cup Records , 2017, CD)

by Jon Davis, Published 2017-07-03

Loafer's Hollow Cover art

It’s been more than ten years since bassist Matthew “Moppa” Elliott formed Mostly Other People Do the Killing as a four-piece with drums, trumpet, and sax. Loafer’s Hollow is their ninth release on Elliott’s Hot Cup label, along with a handful on other labels. This set of tunes sees the group expanded to a septet featuring Elliott on bass, original members Jon Irabagon (saxophone) and Kevin Shea (drums), along with Steven Bernstein (trumpet), Dave Taylor (bass trombone), Brandon Seabrook (guitar, banjo, electronic), and Ron Stabinsky (piano). This is the same lineup that recorded Red Hot (2012) with the exception of Bernstein, who has replaced original trumpeter Peter Evans. The music is a fascinating melding of virtually every stream of jazz that has ever existed, starting with Dixieland and moving through swing, bebop, cool, free, and maybe even a hint of jazz-rock. And, like The Microscopic Septet, who similarly mix jazz styles from different eras, the music is a lot of fun to listen to. There are also commonalities with the small group recordings of Louis Armstrong, Count Basie, and Duke Ellington. The brass instruments are often muted, emphasizing the period sound, but there are some unexpected electronic touches from Seabrook that would throw off a traditionalist. Irabagon’s playing often strays from period authenticity, bringing in elements of later John Coltrane and Ornette Coleman and augmenting them with his own explorations of the outer reaches of what a sax can do. The trumpet and trombone occasionally venture into more modern sounds as well, providing some intriguing contrasts as they blow wildly over backing straight out of a Hot Seven session. Describing all of the surprising moments on Loafer’s Hollow would take as long as listening to the whole thing — suffice it to say this is one of the most creative jazz releases of the year, and if you’re put off by the unconventional juxtapositions, you need to lighten up. Or go back to your old 78s.


Filed under: New releases, 2017 releases

Related artist(s): Mostly Other People Do the Killing

Latest news

2017-07-27
Yestival Dates Beef up the Beat – Word reaches us that Dylan Howe (son of guitarist Steve Howe) will be joining Yes on their "Yestival" tour, drumming alongside longtime band member Alan White. » Read more

2017-05-19
First ProgStock Festival Set for October – October 2017 will see the inaugural edition of a festival called ProgStock in Rahway, New Jersey at the Union County Performing Arts Center. With a definite slant towards neo-progressive music, the event is sure to please many fans with the inclusion of such artists as Echolyn, Glass Hammer, and Aisles. The festival will take place October 13-15. » Read more

2017-05-05
Clive Brooks RIP – Word reaches us today of another sad passing in the music world. Drummer Clive Brooks, best known as a member of such Canterbury bands as Egg, Uriel / Arzachel, and Groundhogs, has died at the age of 67. Details are sketchy at this point. The news was reported on Nick Mason's Facebook page — Brooks was Mason's drum tech. » Read more

2017-05-02
Col. Bruce Hampton RIP – The phrase "He died doing what he loved" is almost a cliche, but in the case of Col. Bruce Hampton, it couldn't be more true. Hampton, who was born Gustav Berglund III, collapsed on stage at his own 70th birthday celebration and later passed away. The event took place at the Fox Theater in Atlanta. » Read more

2017-04-16
ProgDay 2017 Announces First Bands – Flor de Loto, Sonar, and Infinien are the first three performers to be announced for the 2017 edition of the long-running ProgDay Festival. The 23rd ProgDay takes place Saturday and Sunday, September 2nd and 3rd, at Storybook Farm in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Tim Hodgkinson - Pragma – This is a disc of difficult music since the listener must have the discipline to hear the "big picture" and not get caught in a scattering of perceived dissonant ideas. In the composer's own words:...  (1999) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues