Exposé Online banner

Morris Pert — The Music of Stars
(Buckyball BR020, 2001, CD)

Morris Pert — Desert Dances
(North by Northwest NBYNW 005, 2006, CD)

by K. Leimer, Published 2008-10-01

The Music of Stars Cover artDesert Dances Cover art

The compositional premise for The Music of Stars is not as rigorous as Cage’s Etudes Australes or as evocative as Ligeti’s Atmosphères. Pert simply enough organizes nine pieces by the names of the stars comprising the Virgo constellation without indications of going any deeper than an articulating his subjective impressions. So, how exactly how does this music relate to yet another example of human make-believe, a constellation? The Music of Stars exhibits consistent tonality and air of suspension, bringing an important sense of unity to the pieces – something that is perhaps analogous to the psychological phenomenon of “closure” which encourages the mind to see a complete picture where none exists and to then name the imagined relationships something like “Virgo.” There is a general stretched metal quality to the sound, recalling some of the more concrete sonic experiments of Stuart Dempster circa Deep Listening as well as the more typical pop-facing extrapolations of early Tangerine Dream, perhaps even Froese’s Aqua. Like Froese and unlike Dempster, there is less restraint and an untethered compulsion to interrupt some exquisite stretches of pure sound that could just as easily have been left alone. As such The Music of Stars fits the broad and trackless dimensions of generic “space music”: fluid, timbral and too often impulsive, cheating its own stillness of expansive calm by the interjection of bubbly synth gurgles and bleeps that make the resulting aether less a reimagined universe than an agglomeration of already familiar impressions of the one we inhabit.

Desert Dances sets itself a profoundly more earthbound goal. Where The Music of the Stars is often languid, Desert Dances deploys intense and dense rhythm patterns, usually voiced with a world music lexicon, furiously clocked, highly symmetrical, and techno-tribal. The percussion is generous in its range, featuring sampled or imitated log drums, metallics and pitched metals, clappers, and kalimbas, all dominating the frequency range by throwing off everything from low, wooden thumps to glistening metallic lights. These patterns are typically dressed with jazz-inflected keyboard phrasing, lending an improvised feel through shifting harmonics and analog sounding synth with plenty of gliss and pitch bend. The dervish mood breaks midway through the CD, emerging to the sudden calm of piano and hand percussion in “Tangier Nights,” after which these Morris dances return to their obsessive percussive grooves. But despite all the rhythmic complexity, rapid changes and often furious staccato play, the overall effect remains two-dimensional – keyboard and percussion – and tends, oddly, to feel mechanical.

Both these CDs are immaculately, almost clinically, produced. And in each case there is a distinct musical personality at work that is curiously both at odds and completely congruent with the more typical aspects of these forms: distinct but at the same time perhaps too familiar.


Filed under: New releases, Issue 36, 2001 releases, 2006 releases

Related artist(s): Morris Pert

Latest news

2019-08-20
Alex's Hand Seeks Spa Treatment – American / European band Alex's Hand has a new album in the works called Hungarian Spa, which looks to be their biggest and best yet, featuring a large roster of guest musicians. They're seeking funding to take the project on the road, and are looking for help from the crowd of wisdom. » Read more

2019-06-05
Legendary Co-Founder of The 13th Floor Elevators Passes Away at Age 71 – Sadly, Roky Erickson passed away on May 31, 2019. Known as the father of psychedelic music and co-founder of the ground breaking 13th Floor Elevators, Roky had a profound influence on music from the 60s to today. Plagued by his own personal demons, Roky had a difficult life and is now free of these burdens. » Read more

2019-04-24
Help MoonJune Bring Great Music to Life – Like many music lovers around the world, we’ve been thrilled and amazed to hear the recordings that have been released by MoonJune from sessions at La Casa Murada in Spain. Such label stalwarts as Mark Wingfield, Markus Reuter, Asaf Sirkis, Tony Levin, Dusan Jevtovic, Vasil Hadzimanov, and many more have gathered in various combinations at the studio to produce some of the most creative music in recent years. Now, label head Leonardo Pavkovic is offering a compilation, La Casa Murada - MoonJune Sessions, Volume One, as a fundraiser for upcoming sessions. » Read more

2019-04-10
The Pineapple Thief to Tour North America – November and December of 2019 will see The Pineapple Thief bringing their music to Canada, Mexico, and the US, and famed drummer Gavin Harrison will be on board. The band has been touring extensively in Europe, but North America will be new territory for them. » Read more

2019-03-25
Scott Walker RIP – Noel Scott Engel, better known as Scott Walker, was one of the most intriguing and enigmatic musical figures in the second half of the 20th Century. His strange career started with The Walker Brothers, an American pop group that featured no one named Walker and no brothers. After moving to England in 1965, they had a series of hit singles. Scott's solo work started with Scott in 1967. Starting in the 80s, his work took an increasingly avant-garde turn. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Kit Watkins - Kinetic Vapors – Perhaps because of his classical training or his background in the rock world, Kit Watkins' music tends to have a real sense of purpose and direction when approached from the progressive rock...  (1994) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues