Exposé Online banner

The Mark Lomax Trio — Isis and Osiris
(Inarhyme IR-1007, 2014, CD)

by Jon Davis, Published 2015-02-01

Isis and Osiris Cover artThe Mark Lomax Trio features the leader on drums, Edwin Bayard on tenor sax, and Dean Hulett on upright bass. Lomax is the primary composer, though his pieces are quite open-ended, suiting the sparse instrumentation perfectly. Without a chordal instrument (though Hulett sometimes plays multiple notes), both bass and sax are free to roam and embellish within the frameworks given. One thing that really stands out is the variety of the combinations presented even with only three players. Long sections might feature only sax and drums, or only bass and drums; in addition, each man gets at least one "Interlude" all to himself, forming bridges (in a conceptual sense, not the sense of standard song structure) between other pieces. This, of course, gives the album a near-unbroken continuous flow while never staying the same too long. Even "Kemet" — the longest piece at over 11 minutes minutes — moves through differing sections rather than just riffing on a chorus. The musicians themselves are outstanding. Lomax has a way of using his toms that certainly brings to mind African percussion while confined to a standard kit; he delves into swinging grooves occasionally, but for the most part has an unusual style that privides a fresh sound to the music. Bayard is great too, with lines and tones inspired by the past masters of the tenor without sounding derivative, only occasionally squealing or honking, intense and expressive but never obnoxious. Hulett shines whether plucking or bowing, capable of eerie atmospheres, imaginative solos, or driving swing (though without settling into any walking clichés); he fills rhythmic and melodic roles equally well, sometimes simultaneously. Isis and Osiris is without doubt one of my favorite jazz releases of 2014.

Filed under: New releases, 2014 releases

Related artist(s): Mark Lomax, II

Latest news

2020-02-18
Jon Christensen RIP – Word reaches us today of the passing of Norwegian drummer Jon Christensen, a musician whose sensitive playing did much to help define the atmospheric sound of ECM jazz recordings. His work with Jan Garbarek, Bobo Stenson, Terje Rypdal, and many more was sensitive and varied, adapting to a wide variety of styles while maintaining a distinct identity of its own. Christensen was 76. » Read more

2020-01-21
Gong Announces UK Tour for 2020 – Having spent the last few years touring the world, including dates in Japan with psych legend Steve Hillage, multiple headline European tours and festivals, America’s Cruise to the Edge festival, a South America headline tour, and a headline performance at Tomorrow Festival in China, the band have won the hearts of both traditional and modern Gong fanbases. During this live journey, Gong has delved further into the truly psychedelic, exploratory, and mind-expanding side of the music. » Read more

2020-01-15
Carlos Alvarado RIP – Carlos Alvarado, pioneering composer, multi-instrumentalist and pioneer of progressive rock and electronic experimental music in Mexico, passed away January 14th, 2020 at age 68 after a two year battle with cancer.  » Read more

2020-01-12
Wolfgang Dauner RIP – Pianist Wolfgang Dauner, one of the pioneers of both European free jazz and jazz rock, has died at the age of 84. With his own groups and with the United Jazz+Rock Ensemble, his playing and compositions were a prominent presence in European jazz from the mid-60s until just recently. » Read more

2020-01-12
Michael Allison RIP – Michael Allison, who since 1997 has been recording as Darshan Ambient, passed away on January 9th after a long and brave battle with cancer. He has been at at the forefront of the new ambient/electronic music scene, with over eighteen releases to his credit. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Garmarna - Vittrad – Garmarna is doing its part to bring Swedish traditional music into the modern age, coupling the medieval sound of droning fiddles and folk melodies with energetic drums, electric guitars, and modern...  (1999) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues