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Kvazar — Giant's Lullaby
(Musea FGBG 4476.AR, 2005, CD)

by Mac Beaulieu, Published 2006-05-01

Giant's Lullaby Cover art

This Norwegian band’s second album is solid symphonic rock with plenty of engaging twists. “Flight of Shamash” opens with a dreamy sequence, evocative of flight. A chant-like vocal adds to its very cool vibe, interrupted by unexpected walls of sound and voice, not entirely unlike Spacious Mind. Delicious space rock to be sure. The flight of Shamash, being the sun-god, or god of justice, may influence the somewhat dark nature of the lyrics that follow; perhaps it’s a key to a tenuous concept tying the album together. Then again, maybe not. English lyrics are included for those interested and this is one place where the band could use improvement. Though the music is quite good enough to give this fault a pass, it deserves better. The rest of the album is cohesive, featuring a satisfying mix of styles and the aforementioned tendency to shift gears, ultimately to return, finding a sort of closure. “Choir of Life” is a tottering medieval jaunt whose powerful mixture is reminiscent of the gothic Dunwich, while “Dreams of Butterflies” is mellow with jazz and Latin elements, the latter to appear again on the title track which also features a dramatic operatic section. The use of organ, analog synth, Rhodes, and Mellotron are welcome, particularly since they don’t overwhelm and needlessly fulfill the role of a retrofest. Some of the jazz is a bit on the precious side, but thankfully we don’t have to wade through inconveniently placed filler to get through the 64 minute disc.


Filed under: New releases, Issue 33, 2005 releases

Related artist(s): Kvazar

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