Exposé Online banner

Jürgen Karg — Elektronische Mythen
(Bureau B BB226, 1977/2016, CD / LP/ DL)

by Henry Schneider, Published 2017-06-02

Elektronische Mythen Cover art

In the 60s Jürgen Karg played bass for Wolfgang Dauner. Then in the 70s his interests shifted to synthesizers and electronic music. Over a five year period he amassed an extensive collection of synthesizers including four EMS synths. He doubled down on exploring this new genre and in 1977 released his solo album Elektronische Mythen. His system was state of the art in the mid 70s, but having such a complex setup, he was pretty much on his own, as there were hardly any other musicians that he could compare notes with. So he had to face many of the challenges with this system by himself. Consequently Elektronische Mythen is unlike anything else produced in Germany at that time. The music is highly experimental and consists of two side long tracks: “Die vesunkente Stadt - Atlantis” and “Vollmond - Selene.” “Die versunkente Stadt” or “The Sunken City” is a collage of Karg’s earliest attempts at digital sound processing. He culled his recorded material for usable musical results and edited them into this 21 minute piece using several variable speed two- and four-track tape recorders and an eight-track machine. The overall mood is quite dark and foreboding, but there is a lack of coherence to his approach. Sometimes the separate pieces do not fit together leaving silent gaps or abrupt stops and starts. Taken as a whole the track conveys an ever changing and timeless atmosphere. The only element that ties everything together is the short repeated piano riff that pops up now and then. On “Vollmond” or “Full Moon” Karg took a different approach. For this composition Karg worked primarily with sequences of ring modulated sounds, playing around with different combinations and permutations. “Vollmond” is a single abstract composition also lasting about 21 minutes, but it does not exhibit the same academic tendencies as the other track. "Vollmond" is a much improved composition that demonstrates Karg’s compositional skills. This reissue will be of interest to fans of abstract sound environments.


Filed under: Reissues, 2016 releases, 1977 recordings

Related artist(s): Jürgen Karg

Latest news

2019-12-11
There's No Time Like the Present – The Belgian band Present has been one of the best avant-rock bands in the world since its formation in 1979. Over the years since then, Present has released nine amazing albums, and now they're ready to start work on number ten. They're looking for some financial help from their fans around the world. » Read more

2019-11-07
Glenn Smith RIP – Glenn Smith, founder, mandolinist, and primary composer of the DeLand, Florida based prog / fusion band Magnatar, passed away on October 18th 2019 at the age of 68, after a brief illness.  » Read more

2019-11-04
Dino Brassea RIP – Word reaches us of the passing of Dino Brassea, who sang and played flute in Cast for many years. By our count, Brassea appeared on 11 Cast albums between 1994 and 2002. He also released music as a solo artist. » Read more

2019-10-06
Ginger Baker RIP – Legendary English drummer Ginger Baker has died at the age of 80. After coming to fame with Cream in the 60s alongside Eric Clapton and Jack Bruce, he became one of the most recognized and influential drummers of the rock era. On September 25, his family announced that he was critically ill, and on October 6 his death was confirmed. » Read more

2019-08-20
Alex's Hand Seeks Spa Treatment – American / European band Alex's Hand has a new album in the works called Hungarian Spa, which looks to be their biggest and best yet, featuring a large roster of guest musicians. They're seeking funding to take the project on the road, and are looking for help from the crowd of wisdom. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Terra Firma - Earthbound – Climbing out the morass of thrash bands and Pearl Jam clones ascends a new Seattle area group with its feet rooted in Terra Firma and its head in the cosmos. Forget your preconceived notions of space...  (1999) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues