Exposé Online banner

Johannes Luley — Tales from Sheepfather's Grove
(My Sonic Temple MST-1302, 2013, CD)

by Peter Thelen, Published 2013-06-17

Tales from Sheepfather's Grove Cover artAbout half a dozen years ago, the debut album by a very Yes-influenced band from Los Angeles called Moth Vellum crossed my desk on its way to one of the other writers. That's pretty much all I remember about it at this point. Johannes Luley was (and I presume still is) the guitarist in that band, and the album at hand Tales from Sheepfather's Grove is his solo debut. The Roger Dean-like cover art certainly sets the stage for what's about to unfold. Throughout the album's eight tracks (many of which blend together seamlessly), Luley's skills as a composer and arranger, guitarist and multi-instrumentalist are clearly at the fore; he plays all the instruments himself (a very long and impressive list) and sings all the main vocal parts, save a few supporting spots for additional vocals, chanting and concert harp. The percussive parts are primarily bells, tambourine, cymbals, and an assortment of hand drums, which together with the absence of any heavy rock guitar or drum kit, tends to give the proceedings a light and pastoral feel throughout, full of surreal mystery and textures that subtly hint at world styles. This is a thoroughly enjoyable concept disc, beginning to end, but I would be remiss as a reviewer to not mention how much this reminds of Jon Anderson's Olias of Sunhillow at many points along the journey; the overall feeling and inspiration are very similar, and for all who found Olias enjoyable, Sheepfather's Grove will surely be the ticket.

Filed under: New releases, 2013 releases

Related artist(s): Johannes Luley

More info
http://www.johannesluley.com

Latest news

2019-01-31
Keyboardist Ingo Bischof R.I.P. – Keyboard player Ingo Bischof, best known as the longtime keyboard player of German band Kraan, passed away on January 29th, 2019. Bischof was born January 2, 1951 in Berlin-Kreuzberg and joined Kraan in 1975. » Read more

2019-01-11
Jazz Composer Mark Lomax, II Releases Epic 12CD Set – In addition to being a fine jazz drummer, Dr. Mark Lomax, II is a composer in residence at Ohio State University, where he has been very busy on the compositional front. The year 2019 is the 400th anniversary of the arrival of the first ship bringing African slaves to North America, and in commemoration of this, Lomax has produced 400: An Afrikan Epic, a 12 volume set of CDs featuring a variety of different musical ensembles. » Read more

2019-01-02
Chicago-Based Surabhi Ensemble Tours the World in January – Surabhi Ensemble was formed more than a decade ago in Chicago with the aim of bringing together musicians from varying traditions to make music. Saraswathi Ranganathan, who plays veena, assembled a cast that includes Arabic oud, Spanish guitar, and percussion from Africa and India. This month, the group will be sharing their sounds with concert-goers in Southeast Asia, Europe, and Africa. » Read more

2018-12-23
Seaprog Festival Seeks Donations – Seaprog is a small festival in Seattle that highlights creative music from many genres with artists from around the world. It's also a US non-profit organization. They're seeking donations to help keep the ball rolling. Starting in 2013, the organization has been growing, and has featured such artists as Free Salamander Exhibit, Jack o' the Clock, Nik Turner, Cabezas de Cera, Miriodor, Thinking Plague, and many more. » Read more

2018-11-16
The Seventeenth Dream of Dr Sardonicus Festival Tickets Now Available – Fruits de Mer Records and their merry crew of psychedelic explorers are getting set to present the next The Seventeenth Dream of Dr. Sardonicus Festival. The dates are set for August 2-4, 2019 at The Cellar Bar in Cardigan, Wales. They've also announced that the legendary Groundhogs will top the bill. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Kestrel - Kestrel – Here's another mid-70s British prog rock albums with Mellotron and sounding like Fruupp, Spring, Fantasy, and all those I mentioned in the Cressida review. Here is where the music gets a bit too...  (1993) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues