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Jeff Sherman — Gauguin
(Relentless Pursuit RD4136, 2005, CD)

by Jeff Melton, Published 2006-05-01

Gauguin Cover art

Jeff Sherman’s role in the resurgence of Northwest band Glass has been nothing short of surprising. First by bringing the band back together from obscurity (the trio has now released two archive releases and one new acclaimed band effort) and second by releasing three completely different solo ambient projects in as many years (Above & Beyond in 2002 and Home in 2003). In this, his third release, Sherman takes famed international artist Paul Gauguin (1848-1903) as the prime inspiration for three sonic undertakings that indicate an alternate side to his solo synthesizer approach. Sherman demonstrated on his first solo recording that he had the ability to mesh loops and ambient textures into a seamless work less ponderous than most keyboard based works. “The Calling” begins with a tranquil water backwards loop before transitioning into a wider atmospheric river setting that implies lush surroundings. Metallic sounds begin panning from left and right channels that simulate well an old Klaus Schultze method for eventually an inclusion of a traditional Marquesan folk song. Sherman’s poignant piano passages are also work well in the watery setting. “The Consecration” is also a big cinematic effort with emphasis on spacier moments and the best developed Latin tinged them on the recording. The disc’s closing opus, “The Conjuration,” is the closest Sherman has approached Brian Eno’s mid-period work (Music for Films) with the composer showing empathy for a simple melody enhanced by slight effects repeated ad infinitem as the introduction into a brooding piece of processed chants and creepy sound effects. Overall the project will have great appeal to the space music collective and much of the Eurock contingent of fans.


Filed under: New releases, Issue 33, 2005 releases

Related artist(s): Jeff Sherman

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