Exposé Online banner

Janel and Anthony — Where Is Home
(Cuneiform Rune 338, 2012, CD)

by Paul Hightower, 2013-11-16:

Where Is Home Cover art This is Washington DC-based duo Janel Leppin and Anthony Pirog’s second album, and first on Cuneiform. Their eponymous debut from 2006 was self-produced and sold well at gigs, garnering loads of attention for this pair of busy musicians (this is but one of many projects they are involved with). This collection of instrumentals mixes Anthony’s diverse range of guitar stylings with Janel’s deep classical and non-European cello capabilities. She occasionally picks up a guitar herself, as on the leadoff track “Big Sur,” that blends Byrds-ish jangly guitar with energetically articulated lines that call to mind King Crimson. The songs serve as a sort of biographical journal of Janel and Anthony’s travels, either individually or from their touring experiences. Hence titles like “Auburn Road” and “’Cross the Williamsburg Bridge.” The listener will detect feelings of wanderlust, restlessness and ennui coming from the pieces, with a scope that rarely expands beyond the two musicians and an occasional backing track or two. Both have deep reservoirs of talent, demonstrated by traces of surf guitar wafting from “Leaving the Woods” or the looping soundscapes layered to form the dreamy vibe of “Stay with Me.” An expanded palette is explored on “A Viennesian Life,” including lap steel, harpsichord and Mellotron. But even in the bigger-sounding pieces, there’s a charming intimacy involved, as if these two are sharing their innermost thoughts and experiences. That they do this without a word being sung speaks volumes about the quality of the performances and the overall production. Highly recommended.

by Jon Davis, 2013-04-01:

Knowing that Janel and Anthony play cello and guitar doesn't tell you much about what to expect on this album. While those two instruments are prominent on every track, the variety of sounds heard goes far beyond just those two. Guitars come in acoustic and electric varieties, and you'll also encounter keyboards here and there. Plus there's a wide variety of of electronic processing going on, some as simple as effects and loops, some probably farther removed from whatever the original sound sources were. Usually, the impression is more of a small chamber ensemble rather than a duo. Given the absence of a drum kit, there's a gentleness that comes through; while the music is not always strictly diatonic, the dissonance, when it appears, serves to add poignancy rather than discomfort. The musicianship is never flashy, never spoiling a mood with showy sprays of gratuitous notes. The pieces range from brief interludes under a minute long to one nearly eight minutes, and the longer ones often take detours into unexpected territory, such as the arhythmic cello-and-electronic-noises middle part of "Where Will We Go" which is bracketed by lovely melodic sections. But these two make it work, keeping the electronics from overwhelming the pensive mood. Janel and Anthony make music that knows beauty is often enhanced by its flaws, saved from being too precious and fussy by a little bit of chaos.

Filed under: New releases , Issue 40 , 2012 releases

Related artist(s): Janel and Anthony, Janel Leppin, Anthony Pirog

More info

Latest news

2020-07-06
Ennio Morricone RIP – Famed composer Ennio Morricone has died at the age of 91. The creator of scores for more than 500 movies, some of his works have become the most recognizable sounds in the history of cinema. His soundtracks for Sergio Leone's Westerns made from 1964 to 1971, are iconic landmarks in film music, but he also composed for dramas, comedies, and other genres. He won the Academy Award for Best Original Score in 2016 for The Hateful Eight. » Read more

2020-06-14
Keith Tippett RIP – One of the giants of British jazz has left us. Keith Graham Tippetts, known professionally as Keith Tippett, died today at the age of 72. His work from the late 60s into the 70s and beyond includes some of the greatest jazz produced in the UK, and stands as an impressive oevre to this day. » Read more

2020-05-15
Phil May of The Pretty Things RIP – We were saddened to learn that Phil May, lead singer and founding member of The Pretty Things, has died at the age of 75. The band's 1968 album S.F. Sorrow is one of the enduring classics of the psychedelic era, and the group existed in various forms until finally retiring in 2018. » Read more

2020-05-14
Jorge Santana RIP – Jorge Santana, noted guitarist, leader of the band Malo and brother to Carlos Santana, died on May 14 at the age of 68. Jorge and Carlos worked together on a number of occasions, though Jorge's career was centered around Malo, solo work, and with Fania All-Stars. » Read more

2020-05-06
Florian Schneider RIP – Florian Schneider, one of the founders of the pioneering electronic group Kraftwerk, has died at the age of 73. Co-founder Ralf Hütter announced that his bandmate had passed away from cancer after a brief illness. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Ivory - Sad Cypress – Ivory was an obscure German band that recorded and released this album in 1979. What made Ivory unique was their leader Ulrich Sommerlatte, a 65 year old musician! At the ripe old age of 22 Ulrich...  (1994) » Read more

Mother Gong - The Best of Mother Gong – I suppose there's a large segment of the record-buying public (not many Exposé readers among them) for whom the concept of The Best of Mother Gong would be a strange one: that there should...  (1999) » Read more

Hidria Spacefolk - Balansia – Normally it would be problematic for a band to sound the same on their third album (not counting a remix project) as on their first, especially if the first is basically a self-released demo. But when...  (2005) » Read more

Už Jsme Doma - Pohádky Ze Zapotrebí – It's a pretty rare event when I can honestly compare a CD reviewed in this magazine to both Devo and Madness, so I'm going to make the most of it here. The Devo comparisons are actually quite...  (1996) » Read more

Land - Archipelago – In the 70s (or was it the 60s? I can't remember...) Jon Hassell came up with his Fourth World Music concept. Soon after, other folks began to carry on in the same general terrain. Michael William...  (1999) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues