Exposé Online banner

Ian Anderson — Homo Erraticus
(Kscope 291, 2014, CD+DVD)

by Jon Davis, Published 2014-08-15

Homo Erraticus Cover artAt this point in history, the difference between and Ian Anderson album and a Jethro Tull album is more or less irrelevant. All those years when fans ridiculed the uninformed for calling that crazy-eyed flute-player "Jethro" seem pretty distant; only the absence of Martin Barre separates Homo Erraticus from really being a Tull album, and even Barre wasn't on every single release using the Tull name. Anyway, 2014 sees Mr Anderson again "collaborating" with Gerald Bostock, the fictional poet responsible for the lyrics to Thick as a Brick. This time out, Bostock takes as his subject the entirety of the history of the British Isles, from prehistoric times into the future. Unlike the original TaaB with its two side-long tracks, this album is divided into individual tracks, 15 of them, ranging from under a minute to over seven in length. But the entire album does function as a whole, and there are recurring themes holding it together. Somehow Anderson has managed the trick of writing music that hearkens back to the classic mid-70s Tull sound without sounding dated. His acoustic guitar and flute figure prominently in many tracks, as do the electric guitar of Florian Opahle and the keyboards of John O'Hara, both of whom would have fit seamlessly in the Tull of decades past. Opahle's guitar is maybe not as inventive as Barre's, but he acquits himself admirably, and contributes some great playing both as accompaniment and in a lead role. All in all, I can see no reason why a fan of Jethro Tull would dislike Homo Erraticus, and it sounds fresh enough that novices could well enjoy it and find it an entré into the band's massive oeuvre — even though this isn't really a Jethro Tull album. Call it what you like, it's excellent stuff.

Filed under: New releases, 2014 releases

Related artist(s): Ian Anderson

Latest news

2020-11-20
25 Views of Worthing Finally Gets Released – A while ago, we wrote about the discovery of a "long lost" Canterbury-style gem by a band called 25 Views of Worthing. And now we're pleased to find out that Wind Waker Records has released their music on an LP. » Read more

2020-10-14
Audion Is Back in Business – Our esteemed colleague Alan Freeman has restarted Audion Magazine after a seven year hiatus. The new incarnation is available online on their Bandcamp site. Audion's history goes back to 1984, and included 58 issues up to 2013. Issue #59 is available now, and #60 is in the works. » Read more

2020-10-06
Romantic Warriors IV – Krautrock (Part 2) Is in the Works – Zeitgeist Media, the people who have brought us the great series of documentary films chronicling the history of progressive rock, are working on the second installment of their examination of German music. Krautrock 2 will focus on artists from Münich such as Guru Guru, Amon Düül II, Xhol Caravan, Kraan, Witthüser & Westrupp, and Popol Vuh. » Read more

2020-09-09
Simeon Coxe RIP – Simeon Coxe, best known for his experimental electronics in the band Silver Apples, has died at the age of 82. The band's 1968 debut album set the stage for both German electronic music and experimental punk music a decade later. Coxe died on September 8 from pulmonary fibrosis. » Read more

2020-09-05
Gary Peacock RIP – Legendary bassist Gary Peacock, veteran of many recordings and performances with Paul Bley, George Russell, Roland Kirk, Bill Evans, Tony Williams, and many more. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Blodwyn Pig - Ahead Rings Out – Perhaps one day this classic by the Jethro Tull offshoot led by original guitarist Mick Abrahams will get a proper reissue, but until then this latest remastered version from EMI will have to do (and...  (2007) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues