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Gary Peacock RIP

Legendary bassist Gary Peacock, veteran of many recordings and performances with Paul Bley, George Russell, Roland Kirk, Bill Evans, Tony Williams, and many more.

by Jon Davis, Published 2020-09-05

Peacock was born in Burley, Idaho on May 12, 1935 and grew up in Yakima, Washington, initially studying piano, trumpet, and drums. While stationed in Germany in the Army, he played piano in a jazz trio, but ended up switching to bass when the group's bassist quit. He took to the instrument quickly, and stayed in Germany to continue playing after his discharge. Once returning to the US in the early 60s, he landed gigs with Barney Kessel, Art Pepper, and others. He married Annette Coleman in 1960, and she kept his name after their divorce.

In the late 60s, health problems led to him stepping away from music for a time. He moved to Japan and studied the language. He eventually returned to playing, first in Japan, then back in the US. He continued to play and record as a leader and guest, with his last solo album released on ECM in 2017.


Filed under: Obituaries

Related artist(s): Gary Peacock, Annette Peacock, Tony Williams

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