Exposé Online banner

El Sledge (+) — Doom
(Airaid records , 2013, CD)

by Peter Thelen, Published 2013-07-11

Doom Cover art

As the two piano notes, colorful cascade, and acoustic guitar opening with voice at the beginning of the first cut gives way and builds to a more edgy and anguished rock, one might detect a collision of torment and tumult amid the alternative rock approach, seemingly informed by the likes of some of the heavier (but not metal) progressive bands of the past (King Crimson perhaps), but also some nice jazz, avant, and psychedelic elements. Within these notes and measures lie the creative sparks that erupt into a full blown din, while at the same time offering appropriate melodic and rhythmic structures that give it the necessary form and feeling to keep it interesting and highly original. There is real emotion here, both in the lyrics (what one can hear of them), the vocal delivery, and the instrumental attack. And things just keep getting more interesting as the disc proceeds: “The Penticost Broadcast” gets overshadowed by the dark artistry and pensiveness of “Golgotha” which follows it, which in turn makes way for the pure mania of “Primal Scream.” By the time we get to “Ancient Religion / The Eschaton” we are on a frenzied rollercoaster ride into apocalyptic territory. El Sledge was originally just one – Matt Graboski on vocals, guitar, and effects. After drummer Steve Sroka joined forces, the (+) was added for the band’s debut Fletcher’s Last Night. Now Jay Graboski (ex-Oho) is on board as bassist for Doom, which is (if one believes the band’s website) the final piece of the El Sledge (+) vision. Where does it go from here? Does the world just end in flames? I guess we will have to wait and find out, but while we wait, don’t miss out on this moment.


Filed under: New releases, 2013 releases

Related artist(s): El Sledge (+), Matt Graboski

Latest news

2018-09-05
Krautrock Documentary Seeks Funding – The next installment of the Progressive Warriors documentary series will focus on the vast body of music that falls under the banner of "krautrock." As most of our readers will know, previous films have tackled RIO and the Canterbury scene, as well as what we might call "mainstream" prog rock. » Read more

2018-07-31
Tomasz Stańko RIP – Tomasz Stańko, one of the greats of Eastern European jazz, has died at the age of 76. Stańko's career started in Krzysztof Komeda's quintet, where he contributed trumpet from 1963-1967, when he formed his own group. He worked extensively with Edward Vesala, Don Cherry, Zbigniew Seifert, Chico Freeman, Howard Johnson, Cecil Taylor, and many others. Many of his recordings have been released by ECM, an association that began in the mid-70s. » Read more

2018-07-09
Soft Machine Set to Release New Music – It's been 50 years since The Soft Machine changed the face of music with their first album. Their blend of psychedelic rock and jazz was unique, and while the band went through many changes before disbanding in 1981 — by which time there were no original members remaining — they remained an innovative force with a style all their own. » Read more

2018-07-01
7d Surfaces Happy Rhodes Back Catalog – We've covered singer Happy Rhodes before, both for her solo work and recently with The Security Project, but her 11 albums have been hard to track down. Until now. 7d features high-quality downloads of all her releases, and several of them are also available on CD. » Read more

2018-06-25
Fred Chalenor RIP – We have news of another sad passing in the world of creative music. Bassist Fred Chalenor, whose creativity featured on albums by Tone Dogs, Caveman Shoestore, and many more, died on June 23, 2018 after a long battle with Alzheimer's. Tributes have poured in from the many musicians and fans whose lives he touched. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Bill Nelson - Whimsy – Keeping up with Bill Nelson is a difficult task. The man is so prolific that new releases seem to be a mere by-product of his breathing. Luckily he’s supremely talented, and apparently has hit upon...  (2004) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues