Exposé Online banner

Dialeto — Bartók in Rock
(Chromatic CMCD 001, 2017, CD)

by Jon Davis, Published 2017-08-29

Bartók in Rock Cover art

One only has to listen to a piece like “Mikrokosmos 113: Bulgarian Rhythm (I)” to realize that Béla Bartók has a direct relation to avant-progressive rock. (You can find a great arrangement for guitar here, and any number of piano renditions as well.) This little piano piece is clearly related to any number of tracks from King Crimson to Univers Zero and Present, and on Bartók in Rock, Brazilians Dialeto take the natural step of actually arranging it for a rock band. The result is the highlight of the album, and features violinist David Cross along with Nelson Coelho (guitar), Gabriel Costa (bass), and Fred Barley (drums), ripping it up with an aggressive rhythm in various meters. The original generally runs a little over a minute to perform, but they’ve expanded it into 4:21 of instrumental progressive rock, sharing the melody around between the violin and guitar, dividing the backing motif between different players at varying times, and using a variation of that riff to back improvised solos. Cross’s work is outstanding, his solo wild and totally appropriate for the rhythmic and tonal setting. Coelho, for his solo, takes a somewhat different tack, with longer notes mangled by effects. I’ll admit that it’s a bit of a let-down that the other nine tracks don’t feature Cross — more of his great playing would have enhanced the result greatly. Not that Coelho and company are slouches, mind you, but the violin would have provided a welcome change of pace from time to time from all the guitars. I say “guitars” because many of the tracks do involve overdubbed parts to fill out the sound, either providing a rhythmic backing or doubling a melody with a different tone. One more of the “Mikrokosmos” exercises is present, and six of the tracks comprise the “Six Romanian Folk Dances” suite composed in 1915, and they’re arranged in a variety of ways, sometimes resembling rocked-up English or Irish folk dances, sometimes more atmospheric. There are two selections from the “For Children” collection of simple piano pieces (1909), and while neither has the impact of “Mikrokosmos 113,” both “An Evening in the Village” and “The Young Bride” are well done, expanding Bartók’s sketches into full-fledged pieces that can stand on their own. Given the vast wealth of compositions the composer left us, this collection is just a taste of what can be done with such great source material. Even within the “Mikrokosmos” set, there are many that would work well in rock arrangements. For a fan of Bartók who is not averse to electric instruments, Dialeto’s album should work well, and for a progressive rock fan, it stands as just good music, and one of the best adaptations of a composer's music out there.


Filed under: New releases, 2017 releases

Related artist(s): David Cross, Dialeto

More info
http://dialeto.bandcamp.com/album/bart-k-in-rock

Latest news

2020-07-22
Tim Smith RIP – Tim Smith, leader of the eccentric band Cardiacs, has died at the ago of 59 after many years of health problems. Cardiacs was known for intense and complicated music that combined punk energy with the rhythmic and harmonic sophistication of progressive rock. » Read more

2020-07-12
Judy Dyble RIP – Singer-songwriter Judy Dyble, who was a founding member of Fairport Convention and one of the distinctive voices of the 60s folk revival in Britain, has died at the age of 71. Her passing came at the end of a long illness, though which she continued to work. » Read more

2020-07-06
Ennio Morricone RIP – Famed composer Ennio Morricone has died at the age of 91. The creator of scores for more than 500 movies, some of his works have become the most recognizable sounds in the history of cinema. His soundtracks for Sergio Leone's Westerns made from 1964 to 1971, are iconic landmarks in film music, but he also composed for dramas, comedies, and other genres. He won the Academy Award for Best Original Score in 2016 for The Hateful Eight. » Read more

2020-06-14
Keith Tippett RIP – One of the giants of British jazz has left us. Keith Graham Tippetts, known professionally as Keith Tippett, died today at the age of 72. His work from the late 60s into the 70s and beyond includes some of the greatest jazz produced in the UK, and stands as an impressive oevre to this day. » Read more

2020-05-15
Phil May of The Pretty Things RIP – We were saddened to learn that Phil May, lead singer and founding member of The Pretty Things, has died at the age of 75. The band's 1968 album S.F. Sorrow is one of the enduring classics of the psychedelic era, and the group existed in various forms until finally retiring in 2018. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Level ∏ - Electronic Sheep – Electronic Sheep is Uwe Cremer’s (aka Level ∏) second release and though firmly rooted in the Teutonic and Berlin-school of electronics, it is quite a departure from Entrance. Gone are the...  (2011) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues