Exposé Online banner

InterStatic — Arise
(RareNoise RNR033, 2014, CD)

by Jon Davis, Published 2014-07-21

Arise Cover artRight out of the gate, you're greeted by a gnarly guitar doing a twisted variation on a standard rock 'n' roll rhythm part, and soon there's a tasty lead line to go with it. A minute or so later you get some long chords on a Hammond — there's something to be said for the real thing, isn't there? When the guitar solo starts, we get our fist taste of the wah-wah which will play a prominent role throughout Arise. InterStatic is a trio based in Norway, though keyboardist Roy Powell is British and guitarist Jacob Young, while Norwegian, has spent time in New York (studying with John Abercrombie, among other things); drummer Jarle Vespestad has worked with Supersilent, Farmers Market, and various of Tord Gustavsen's groups. The second track, "Caerbannog," introduces another set of variables into the mix, notably synthesizers and odd meters. It's a great slab of adventurous jazz-rock far removed from the slickness of much that's passed for "fusion" over the last few decades. "Alpha Dog" is another winner, with a cool swinging drum part and some outstanding guitar playing. Powell holds down the bottom end admirably with his keyboards, so the lack of a dedicated bass instrument is never a detriment. These guys really bring it, whether the energy level is low or high, subtle or aggressive. While it fits in with some of the more rock-oriented Scandinavian jazz groups, like Terje Rypdal's Chaser or Raoul Björkenheim's Ecstasy, it does have its own sound, partly due to Powell's great keyboard work. Composition duties are split between Powell and Young, and both provide some memorable tunes. InterStatic is definitely a group worth investigating for those who look fondly on the heady early days of jazz meeting rock and not ending up sappy.

Filed under: New releases, 2014 releases

Related artist(s): InterStatic

Latest news

2020-12-09
Harold Budd RIP – Harold Budd, one of pre-eminent American composers of avant-garde and minimalism, has died of complications from the coronavirus. Budd came to prominence in the 70s, championed by Brian Eno on his Obscure Records label, with music that blended academic minimalism with electric jazz and electronic music. Much of Budd's best known work was done in collaboration with other artists, including Eno, Daniel Lanois, Robin Guthrie, Andy Partridge, John Foxx, Jah Wobble, and many others. » Read more

2020-11-20
25 Views of Worthing Finally Gets Released – A while ago, we wrote about the discovery of a "long lost" Canterbury-style gem by a band called 25 Views of Worthing. And now we're pleased to find out that Wind Waker Records has released their music on an LP. » Read more

2020-10-14
Audion Is Back in Business – Our esteemed colleague Alan Freeman has restarted Audion Magazine after a seven year hiatus. The new incarnation is available online on their Bandcamp site. Audion's history goes back to 1984, and included 58 issues up to 2013. Issue #59 is available now, and #60 is in the works. » Read more

2020-10-06
Romantic Warriors IV – Krautrock (Part 2) Is in the Works – Zeitgeist Media, the people who have brought us the great series of documentary films chronicling the history of progressive rock, are working on the second installment of their examination of German music. Krautrock 2 will focus on artists from Münich such as Guru Guru, Amon Düül II, Xhol Caravan, Kraan, Witthüser & Westrupp, and Popol Vuh. » Read more

2020-09-09
Simeon Coxe RIP – Simeon Coxe, best known for his experimental electronics in the band Silver Apples, has died at the age of 82. The band's 1968 debut album set the stage for both German electronic music and experimental punk music a decade later. Coxe died on September 8 from pulmonary fibrosis. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Masque - Third Ear/Third Eye – Third Ear/Third Eye is this brazen Japanese quintet's first CD release (following a couple of cassette releases in the late 80s, plus contributions to the Canterbury Edge and Jazz Rock sampler...  (1999) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues