Exposé Online banner

Apocalypse — Perto do Amanhecer
(Musea FGBG 4136.AR, 1995, CD)

by Peter Thelen, Published 1995-11-01

Perto do Amanhecer Cover art

This is the second outing for this four-piece from Brazil, their first self-titled album from the late 80s still being a vinyl-only release. Their neo-progressive sound and dramatic styling have rightly earned them the reputation as the Brazilian Marillion (a cover version of "Lavender" on their first album may have something to do with it too). Within the confines of the neo-progressive realm they have produced an album's worth of compositions with fresh originality and renewed fire. Musicianship is of a high caliber, as a band they are tight and don't fall into many of the usual traps — for the first half of the album at least. While this overall style has been worked to death in the last ten years, one wonders if there is any territory within it that hasn't already been covered. Apocalypse proves that there is still plenty of room left to explore. But the problems begin at around the forty minute mark, when all that was good about this album starts to rapidly deteriorate. Parts of "Corta" are nothing more than a blatant ripoff of "He Knows You Know" with some minor variances. The boom-bash neo-drumming becomes unbearable in "Limites de Vento" — a slower, Bowie-like ballad, and some of the ideas on "Lagrimas" are straight rips from Misplaced Childhood. If the last thirty minutes offered as much promise as the first thirty, this might have been a fairly decent album. Unfortunately the band had to go and pad it all out with a bunch of substandard hokum. Makes a convincing argument for keeping CDs short and to the point.

Filed under: New releases, Issue 8, 1995 releases

Related artist(s): Apocalypse, Eloy Fritsch

Latest news

Seaprog 2018 Artist Announcements Raise Festival's Profile – Seattle's Seaprog festival has been going since 2013, and the 2018 edition features a slate of artists that's sure to bring more attention to the event. Cheer-Accident, Bubblemath, and Free Salamander Exhibit are in the first round announcement of performers. In keeping with their tradition of focusing on regional artists, they will also present a number of artists from Washington, Oregon, and British Columbia. [Edit: Just added: Inner Ear Brigade] » Read more

Adelbert von Deyen RIP – Word reaches us that German electronic musician Adelbert von Deyen has died. His recorded legacy reaches back to 1978, when Sky Records released Sternzeit. Von Deyen, who was born October 25, 1953 in Süderbrarup, was also known as a painter and graphic artist. » Read more

Didier Lockwood RIP – Word reaches us today of the death of one of France's great jazz musicians, violinist Didier Lockwood. His playing bridged many worlds, from traditional jazz to fusion to progressive rock, and his talent can be heard on recordings by Magma, Clearlight, Pierre Moerlen's Gong, and many more. Lockwood was 62. » Read more

10 Years of Fruits de Mer - The Incomplete Angler – Those of you who are faithful followers of Exposé will know that we have been promoting Fruits de Mer and its side labels and releases from nearly its first year. Now music journalist and author Dave Thompson has written a book chronicling the past ten years as a celebration of this milestone. » Read more

Tom Rapp RIP – Singer / songwriter Tom Rapp, best known with the band Pearls Before Swine, passed away on February 12, at the age of 70, after a battle with cancer. » Read more

Previously in Exposé...

(Tom Newman) - Variations on a Rhythm of Mike Oldfield - David Bedford – This is a four track EP, and is basically a Tom Newman album. It's confusing, I know. This is some of that stuff you know Oldfield and Co. did for laughs (when perhaps beer and worse entered the...  (1998) » Read more

Listen & discover

Print issues