Exposé Online banner

DeeperNET — Impossible Landscape
(Spotted Peccary SPM-2202, 2014, CD)

by Paul Hightower, Published 2014-11-14

Impossible Landscape Cover art

DeeperNET is the nom de plum of Oregon-based musician Andrew Miles. For his sophomore outing he mines the same heavily layered electronic sounds that infused his 2013 debut, One. Fans of Steve Roach, The Orb, or even Daft Punk will appreciate the rich mixture of analog waveforms, synthesizer atmospherics, and processed rhythms spread across these 11 tracks, all capably engineered into vast, dynamic soundscapes. With the confidence of One under his belt, Miles allows himself to stretch out a bit more by incorporating enticing acoustic textures into tracks like “Fluid in Blue,” which also features the sensual vocals of Zephora. Elsewhere, as on “Fractal Dimension,” he turns the clock back to the sort of bouncy electronic rock that served Alan Parsons so well in the 70s, and he even dabbles in thick, Schulzian analog goodness on tracks like “Thought Drop.” But most notable are the use of bleeding edge stylings that have turned up in clubs across Europe, including razor-blade track splices, skittering percussion, spurting synths, distorted drums, and downtempo grooves. What makes it all hang together is Miles’ affinity for building each track around a melodic or rhythmic focal point — as much as one can expect in the realm of EM anyways. This is where his musical voice is most evident and for the most part his ideas succeed. It all makes for a varied collection that most EM fans should find to their liking, as long as they don’t mind some of the more modern flourishes.


Filed under: New releases, 2014 releases

Related artist(s): DeeperNET (Andrew Miles)

More info
http://ambientelectronic.bandcamp.com/album/impossible-landscape

Latest news

2018-04-05
OBEY Convention XI Set for May 24-28 in Halifax – As the 2018 festival season rapidly approaches, we’d like you to be aware of a real treasure of diverse and creative music that’s going to take place in Halifax, Nova Scotia, next month. The OBEY Convention is on its 11th outing, and features a wide range of artists from around the world. From avant-industrial noise to experimental takes on Classical Chinese music, from chamber jazz to doom metal, from ambient soundscapes to Canadian First Nations drumming, you’d be hard pressed to find a festival with more variety in sound anywhere in the world. » Read more

2018-04-04
Close to the Rain Festival in Bergen Announces Lineup – Now in its second year, the Close to the Rain Festival of progressive music is scheduled to take place in Bergen, Norway, on June 7 - 9. They've got an amazing slate of bands lined up, including such powerhouses as Anekdoten, Major Parkinson, Arabs in Aspic, Tusmørke, and many more. » Read more

2018-03-01
Seaprog 2018 Artist Announcements Raise Festival's Profile – Seattle's Seaprog festival has been going since 2013, and the 2018 edition features a slate of artists that's sure to bring more attention to the event. Cheer-Accident, Bubblemath, and Free Salamander Exhibit are in the first round announcement of performers. In keeping with their tradition of focusing on regional artists, they will also present a number of artists from Washington and Oregon. [Edit: Just added: Inner Ear Brigade] » Read more

2018-02-26
Adelbert von Deyen RIP – Word reaches us that German electronic musician Adelbert von Deyen has died. His recorded legacy reaches back to 1978, when Sky Records released Sternzeit. Von Deyen, who was born October 25, 1953 in Süderbrarup, was also known as a painter and graphic artist. » Read more

2018-02-18
Didier Lockwood RIP – Word reaches us today of the death of one of France's great jazz musicians, violinist Didier Lockwood. His playing bridged many worlds, from traditional jazz to fusion to progressive rock, and his talent can be heard on recordings by Magma, Clearlight, Pierre Moerlen's Gong, and many more. Lockwood was 62. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Surge - For the Time Being – Why is European mainland jazz ignored or worse yet, simply prejudiced as being lesser than US contemporaries? And does jazz have to be black to be good? These questions have been asked by reviewers...  (1998) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues